April South Preschool Newsletter

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Hello April~

 
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This month, the South Preschool students will learn about flowers. We will discuss the different parts of a flower, the life cycle of flowers, and incorporate flowers into art and practical life projects.

“There is a great sense of community within the Montessori classroom, where children of differing ages work together in an atmosphere of cooperation rather than competitiveness.”--Maria Montessori


Dates to remember:

  • Tiny Tots on April 12, at Benaroya Hall

Quick Classroom Reminders:

  • Please be sure your child has extra clothes in his/her cubby

 

 

 

 

April Birthdays:

Olivia (4) April 25 ; Jane (4) April 28

 
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April North Preschool Newsletter

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Hello April~

 
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This month, the North Preschool students will study frogs! They’ll learn about the life cycle of a frog, its different body parts, and complete several frog-related art projects. North Preschool will also welcome two new students, Camilla and Frida!

“The goal of early childhood education should be to activate the child’s own natural desire to learn.”--Maria Montessori


Dates to remember:

  • Tiny Tots on April 12, at Benaroya Hall

Quick Classroom Reminders:

  • Please be sure your child has extra clothes in his/her cubby

 

 

 

April Birthdays:

Jackson (4) April 1 ; Ivan (3) April 18 ; Taani (3) April 30

 
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April Toddler Newsletter

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Hello April~

 
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This month, as our weather improves, the toddler students will learn about spring! This includes discussing the change in season, learning about flowers, and naming different bugs. During circle time, we will sing “Itsy Bitsy Spider.”

“The senses, being explorers of the world, open the way to knowledge.”--Maria Montessori


Dates to remember:

  • Tiny Tots on April 12, at Benaroya Hall

Quick Classroom Reminders:

Please check to see that your child has extra clothes and diapers in the classroom.

 

 

 

April Birthdays:

Coming soon!

 
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April Infant Newsletter

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Hello April~

This month, we welcome a new child to our classroom—Max. Isabella will transition to the toddler classroom! We know she will do well in her new environment. Our theme for the month of April is weather. We have weather flash cards, books, and fun decor for the infants to enjoy. We hope to spend as much time as possible outdoors, and our teachers will talk to the students about weather patterns!

Weekly focus—

  • April 1–5: Sensory

  • April 8–12: Practical Life

  • April 15–19: Fine Motor/Cognitive

  • April 22–30: Object Permanence


 
An authentic child is one who feels secure, autonomous, competent, and connected.
When we help a child to feel secure, feel appreciated, feel that ‘somebody is deeply, truly interested in me,’ by the way we just look, the way we just listen, we influence that child’s whole personality, the way that child sees life.
— RIE Principal
 

Dates to remember:

  • Coming soon!

Classroom reminder:

Please label your child's bottles and/or food with their first and last name, date, and the type of milk or food. Let us know if your child has dietary restrictions! We'll update thier file and ensure these are monitored during communal snack times. Thank you!

April Birthdays:

Michael (1) April 5 ; Cruz (1)

 
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March Infant Newsletter

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Hello March~

This month, we have several infants on the verge of walking. It’s an exciting time in their development and a privilege to witness in the classroom! To support this developmental milestone, we have several “pushing works” in our environment. (This is something you can emulate at home if your child is close to walking.) Pushing work helps prepare an infant for weight shifting to their feet, strengthens hand-eye and bilateral coordination, and encourages the movement of walking! We have several rolling carts and cars throughout the classroom for students to enjoy.


 
An authentic child is one who feels secure, autonomous, competent, and connected.
When we help a child to feel secure, feel appreciated, feel that ‘somebody is deeply, truly interested in me,’ by the way we just look, the way we just listen, we influence that child’s whole personality, the way that child sees life.
— RIE Principal
 

Dates to remember:

  • Valentine's Day Craft Night--February 7, from 4:00-5:30pm
  • PFM closure--February 18 for President's Day

Classroom reminder:

Please check your child's cubby at pickup to see whether they are low on supplies. Also, please label your child's bottles and/or food with their first and last name, the date, and the type of milk or food. Let us know if your child has dietary restrictions! We'll update thier file and ensure these are monitored during communal snack times. Thank you!

 
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Coping with Aggression and Teaching Self-Control

Young children, including toddlers, may exhibit seemingly aggressive behaviors. Around 12-18 months of age, children are learning how to separate from their caregiver(s). This can be a stressful time! Additionally, it is a critical point in child development as their language skills expand. While toddlers and young preschool students become increasingly verbal, they may continue to rely on body language—such as hitting or biting—to express stress, anger, sadness, etc.

When working with young children, it is important to remember the specific child’s age when assessing aggressive behavior. For infants—from 0-12 months—it is helpful to redirect unwanted behavior after acknowledging how the infant may feel. For example, if a baby pulls your hair, you can say, “Ouch, that hurts my body.” Then, direct the infant towards something positive they can do with their hands.

This process of redirecting is relevant for toddlers, too. However, you can also provide the child with language surrounding the behavior. A few other tips include: staying calm, recognizing the child’s feelings, offering alternatives, and encouraging the child to take a break. These tips are practiced by PFM staff and can be emulated in the home environment.

For additional information and support, we invite you to read this article. Throughout the month of April, we will host parent-teacher conferences. This is an opportune time to discuss your child’s behavior and how best to support their physical and emotional development.

Head of School Newsletter: April

PFM Families,

We had a fantastic March! This year’s auction was incredibly successful thanks to the generous donations and purchases from our families. We thank you for helping make this school as great as it can be! Because of your support, we will be able to send teachers to the AMS Montessori Conference next year and one teacher will get to go to the RIE Conference as well! Teacher education is incredibly important, and we are lucky to be able to further our learning to support all of the children in our care each day.

Grace’s little sister Max joined the infant room this month! We are so excited to have both of the Van Osdol kiddos at the school now. Frida joined North preschool, and Camilla transitioned to North class from the toddler room.

In April, the toddlers and preschooler students will take a trip to “Tiny Tots” at Benaroya Hall. This is always one of our favorite events. We also begin preschool conferences in the month of April. We strongly encourage all families to sign up for a parent-teacher conference to learn about your child’s progress in the classroom.

Looking forward to a great month ahead!

Teddi Blades

Director & Owner, PFM

How to Teach Your Child to Appropriately Get Your Attention

Trying to get someone’s attention can prove difficult, and it can be a frustrating process for both children and adults. As adults, we may choose to tap someone on the shoulder or whisper, “excuse me,” to gain their attention.

As children work to develop language skills, saying “excuse me” to get mom or dad’s attention is not front-of-mind. Instead, they may resort to behaviors that elicit a response or reaction. This could include whining, yelling, or other less-desirable behaviors. (As parents, we’re quick to respond when our child yells, and this is something we work to improve on in the classroom, too.)

A few ways in which we can teach children to appropriately get our attention include:

  1. Model the behavior you’re teaching your child.

  2. Practice, practice, practice! Play with this new skill with your child, family, and school community.

  3. Remind your child of your expectations. For example, you may choose to say, “It looks like you want to tell me something. I’d like to talk to you after you tap me gently on the shoulder.”

  4. Celebrate when your child demonstrates their new skill.

To learn more about how best to support your child’s behavior, we invite you to read the complete article.